Home > Uncategorized > EFFector – U.S. Government Seizes 82 Websites: A Glimpse at the Draconian Future of Copyright Enforcement?

EFFector – U.S. Government Seizes 82 Websites: A Glimpse at the Draconian Future of Copyright Enforcement?

From EFFector:

U.S. Government Seizes 82 Websites: A Glimpse at the Draconian Future of Copyright Enforcement?

The U.S. Justice Department, the Department of Homeland Security, and nine U.S. Attorney’s Offices seized 82 domain names of websites they claim were engaged in the sale and distribution of counterfeit goods and illegal copyrighted works. The sites were seized without websites owners given any advance notice or recourse, and the “raid” swept up several sites that are hardly in the business of willful copyright infringement. Could this be a preview of the overreaching enforcement to come if Congress passes the Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act (COICA)?

EFF Tool Offers New Protection Against ‘Firesheep’

EFF launched a new version of HTTPS Everywhere, a security tool that offers enhanced protection for Firefox browser users. The new version of HTTPS Everywhere responds to concerns about online security highlighted earlier this year by Firesheep, an attack tool that could enable an eavesdropper on a network to take over a user’s web account. EFF’s Firefox add-on creates a default setting that indicates a preference for encrypted communications. If the website is configured to allow encryption via HTTPS (a security practice we believe all major websites should adopt!) then users of the HTTPS Everywhere add-on can protect themselves from attacks such as Firesheep.

Common Sense and Security: Body Scanners, Accountability, and $2.4 Billion Worth of Security Theater

TSA has been facing intense public heat after instituting new security proceedings that force people to choose between an invasive digital strip search or an intense physical search. TSA defends its practices as necessary to ensure security — but there’s no evidence that whole-body scanners make us safer. And at a cost to American taxpayers of $2.4 billion, we’re spending a lot of money on technology that sacrifices privacy without improving our security.

Advertisements
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: